Category Archives: Windows

How To Fix the defaultuser0 Problem in Windows 10

I was working on a new laptop for a client (preapring a basic setup and installing some software solutions for his business) that came pre-installed with Windows 10 and no support media. After a nominal wait for the OS to perform its “first run” checks and setup, I was presented with the Windows 10 login screen, but the only user account available was this “defaultuser0”, which I did not have the password to. Normally, I would refer to the manual (or quick start guide in a pinch), but the refurbished Acer from Newegg came with only a single slip of paper explaining the warranty. My years of experience with Windows taught me that the first step in troubleshooting is to reboot (possibly into Safe Mode) which you can technically only do from inside Windows, so I did the next best thing: a hard power-off reset.

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Yes, I know you’re never supposed to do that. Sometimes you have no alternative but to use a little brute force.

Upon the reset, Windows returned to the initial setup screens, asking me for language, keyboard layout, and prompting me to leak as much data as possible back to Microsoft (to which I always opt out). So far, so good; however, after an unusually long “Just a moment…” screen, the monitor dropped to a blank screen with only a cursor. All the information that I was able to locate pointed to a driver problem and that the screen would initialize after a prolonged wait. That was a sucker test. I waited an entire day before giving up the ghost on that idea.

After much gnashing of teeth, I was able to assemble a solution from several partial solutions scattered through the Windows 10 fora, but lucky you, I’m going to share the fruits of my labor!

First thing to do in this situation is perform the hard reset. Hold the power button until the computer turns off. Wait a few moments for the hard drive(s) to stop spinning before powering the computer on again.

Once Windows gets as far as the Regional Settings dialog (the screen asking for language, time zone, and keyboard layout), press CTRL+SHIFT+F3 to reboot the computer into audit mode. Once you’re finally “properly” into Windows, ignore the System Preparation Tool window, open the Start Menu, then click “Power”. Hold down the left-hand SHIFT key, click “Restart” and keep the SHIFT key held until the reboot options screen appears.

restart-optionsClick “Troubleshoot”, then “Reset This PC”, and finally “Remove Everything”. You’ll drop to a black screen with the word “Preparing” in the large, friendly letters characteristic of Windows 10. Eventually, you will return to a blue screen asking if you want to clean the drives as well. Click “Just remove my files” and then the “Reset” button on the next page. The screen will go black again and display the Windows 10 progress indicator while it chugs through the reset process.

Grab yourself a beer and watch some cartoons because it will take a while to finish, but when it completes Windows should be ready to play nicely during setup, and not throw you another defaultuser0 error.

‘Synergy’ Allows Quick, Easy, Seamless Keyboard/Mouse Sharing Across Multiple Computers

I ran across a special on Boing Boing for a bundle of Mac software that I couldn’t resist (Paragon NTFS For Mac alone was worth the discounted price), and made an impulse buy. I’ll write more about each application later as I play with them, but I wanted to give special recognition to this Synergy app from the mind of one Nick Bolton.

I have been working on Project Magnavox for almost 2 years now (It’s an ever-evolving project, as you dear readers have no doubt figured out), but I have always had to juggle between my laptop or tablet and the wireless keyboard that I have attached to the VCR. With Synergy, I am able to interact with the VCR using only the keyboard and trackpad on the laptop! Think of it as a sort of KVM switch, but instead of flipping a physical switch, you simply drag the mouse to the screen you need to interact with and you’re ready to go. Seamless.

Installation is a snap. Once you sign up and pay for an account, simply download the application to each computer you wish to connect. Enter your credentials on each computer, decide on a “host” machine (whose keyboard and mouse you will be using), and position the clients relative to the host’s monitor position. For example, my laptop is the host machine, and I simply drag the mouse off the top of the screen for it to appear on the TV connected to Project Magnavox. The best part is that I can sit comfortably at the table across the room, work on Project Magnavox, and need not worry about staying within range of my el cheapo wireless keyboard.

Synergy is software for sharing one keyboard and mouse between multiple computers.

Source: Synergy – Mouse and keyboard sharing software

​Microsoft and Canonical partner to bring Ubuntu to Windows 10

Okay, Mr. Nadella, you have my attention….

You’ll soon be able to run Ubuntu on Windows 10.

Source: ​Microsoft and Canonical partner to bring Ubuntu to Windows 10 | ZDNet

How To Install RetroArch in Windows

Building Project Magnavox into a genuine all-in-one entertainment system is more than just being able to access all my videos, music, and streaming media on one device. To round-out the feature set, we need to take a page from Microsoft’s playbook and add videogames to the mix. Granted, I could install all my game consoles underneath the television, but that takes up more room than I actually have in my small apartment. Besides, outside the aesthetic benefits of having a veritable museum in my living room, it’s frankly more trouble than it’s worth to rig the wiring, route the cabling, and squint at a screen stretched beyond its original aspect ratio. As awesome as James Rolfe‘s basement is, until I have my own library, I’d like to keep my setup as space-efficient as possible.

This leaves me with one of the most polarizing concepts in classic gaming: emulation.

Now, I’m no stranger to the debate, and let me first say adamantly that it is the opinion of this reporter that, legally speaking, you may make backup copies of software that you have legitimately obtained for personal use [emphasis added]. This is the only application that we will be dealing with here. Secondly, I advocate for emulation in this sense because it does make playing the games much easier and convenient, contributing to my own enjoyment. Thirdly, the so-called “collector’s market” has driven the prices for games through an unsustainable ceiling, and because young millennials would like bragging rights by being able to “own” a copy of a particular game, all the carts and discs worth playing have been bought up only to appear on eBay at ten times or more their original price. Much like the market for vinyl has all-but ruined the casual collection of original-run albums, the market for cartridges and discs has similarly eroded the enjoyment from the hobby.
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Enter Libretro, a handy piece of software that seeks to pull as many different emulator “cores” into one central application, running almost any classic game as close to original quality as possible in a convenient package. The Libretro API uses a custom front-end called RetroArch to set up and run the roms for each emulator core. The pair are installed simultaneously as a package, and each core is installed as an add-on from within RetroArch itself.

To install RetroArch in Windows, simply download the latest stable RetroArch build from the website, then unzip the downloaded file to the location of your choosing. If you’re still running Windows 7 (because fuck Windows 10), you may run into a missing file error. Specifically, you may be missing d3dx9_43.dll from the DirectX runtime, so you should follow my instructions for fixing that error here.

That’s it! RetroArch is completely self-contained and should run without incident. Use the arrow keys, Z, and X for most of the navigation (you’ll see a control map on first run), download an emulator core from the Online Updater menu, open your freshly-dumped roms, and get playing!

Windows 10 telemetry secrets: Where, when, and why Microsoft collects your data

Basically, keep the settings as low as possible to avoid potential security leaks. I’ll still keep my Windows 7, thankyouverymuch.

How does Windows 10 telemetry really work? It’s not a state secret. I’ve gone through the documentation and sorted out the where, when, and why. If you’re concerned about private documents accidentally leaving your network, you might want to turn the telemetry setting down.

Source: Windows 10 telemetry secrets: Where, when, and why Microsoft collects your data | ZDNet

Windows 10 Worst Feature To Install On Windows 7 And Windows 8

Now, you have to specifically research every update that gets pushed to your Windows 7 or 8 machine before you install it to make sure it doesn’t contain malware new features!

Source: Windows 10 Worst Feature To Install On Windows 7 And Windows 8 – Forbes

Microsoft Reveals Real Cost Of ‘Free’ Windows 10

“I have altered the deal. Pray I don’t alter it any further.” –Darth Nadella?

“There is no such thing as a free lunch” has been the mantra of those cynical about the true cost of ‘free’ Windows 10. But as Microsoft increases pressure on users to upgrade, it turns out the real cost of Windows 10 lies somewhere far less expected…

Source: Microsoft Reveals Real Cost Of ‘Free’ Windows 10 – Forbes