PlayStation Classic Unboxing

With this PlayStation Classic unboxing video, we’ll be taking a little trip down memory lane, reminiscing about gaming in the mid-1990s, and exploring the pros and cons of the hotly-debated system. Later in this series, we’ll be tearing down the console before hacking it to “fix” many of the alleged problems with the aggrieved PlayStation Classic.

If you are a gamer of a certain age, I highly recommend picking up a PlayStation Classic on Amazon and subscribing as we proceed to hack it into the device it should have been! https://amzn.to/2Eyceww

Newark TC-110 Tool Case Unboxing and Review

The Duratool TC-110 tool case from Newark element14 is a great, inexpensive, heavy-duty case for transporting small hand tools and test equipment. It’s made of a lightweight MDF shell coated in textured, heavy-duty ABS plastic and accented with brushed aluminum on the corners to provide extra protection against bumps and dings. Inside, there is a large cushion of perforated foam that can be cut to custom size and shape for any variety of instruments while the lid is complemented by a solid piece of egg-carton foam and a removable pallet for small hand tools. For the price, it may be one of the best tool cases on the market!

See it on Newark

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Unboxing The Most Useless IoT Device Ever

Clem Mayer challenged me to add more useless “functionality” to the “Most Useless IoT Device Ever” on Element14 Presents, but the IoT Rock had to get from Austria to California first!

These are my initial reactions to the Cold War-themed care package my European colleague sent me!

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Project Serling Outtakes

Project: Serling is an electronic reproduction of the “Mystic Seer” prop from the Twilight Zone episode “Nick of Time”. In the show, William Shatner’s character becomes obsessed with the seemingly correct predictions of a coin-operated fortune teller machine. The version being built for element14 Presents is a Raspberry Pi-powered device that uses a thermal printer to deliver randomly-selected answers to yes or no questions.

Watch the full video at element14!

Element14: Twilight Zone Prop Replica

Matt is a huge fan of the Twilight Zone, so for Halloween, he’s decided to build a classic prop from the old series with a modern twist! The original Mystic Seer was a coin-operated fortune telling machine created for the 1960 episode “Nick of Time”. Will this new, electronic fortune teller actually predict the future? Supplemental Content and B.O.M. on element14: http://bit.ly/2O5fz6x

Build The Twilight Zone Mystic Seer Prop [TRAILER]

Project: Serling is an electronic reproduction of the “Mystic Seer” prop from the Twilight Zone episode “Nick of Time”. In the show, William Shatner’s character becomes obsessed with the seemingly correct predictions of a coin-operated fortune teller machine. The version being built for element14 Presents is a Raspberry Pi-powered device that uses a thermal printer to deliver randomly-selected answers to yes or no questions.

Watch the full video at element14!

Octopussy & the Living Daylights (James Bond, #14)

Octopussy & the Living Daylights (James Bond, #14)
author: Ian Fleming
name: Matthew
average rating: 3.54
book published: 1966
rating: 3
read at: 2018/10/20
date added: 2018/10/20
shelves:
review: This collection of short stories more appropriately belongs somewhere before You Only Live Twice, but was not published until after Ian Fleming’s death in 1964. It contains three short stories: “Octopussy”, “The Property of a Lady”, and “The Living Daylights” which–like For Your Eyes Only before them–are appetizer-sized vignettes into some of James Bond‘s smaller, but nonetheless interesting, adventures.

“Octopussy” ruminates on a man’s past glory, his dissatisfaction with his life, and the war crime that was to be his rise and ultimate downfall. James Bond is sent to extradite a former British officer from Jamaica in order to stand trial for crimes committed during the allied occupation of Germany at the end of WWII. It is a story of guilt and the ghosts that follow us when ill-gotten gains become our way of life.

“Property of a Lady” is referenced more by the plot of Octopussy the film than its namesake story. The Faberge Egg plot device of the film is lifted directly from this short story which finds Bond in an unfamiliar world of London’s exclusive luxury auction houses, notably Sotheby’s, on a hunch that the KGB is using the sale of a valuable piece of jewelry to pay off an agent that has been dutifully performing work for the Kremlin while handling cypher communications for MI-6 (entirely to MI-6’s knowledge as she is constantly fed false and misdirected information to confound the KGB). It’s a fun little romp that Fleming obviously enjoyed writing and is full of wry, subtle humor that the film series is often celebrated for.

“The Living Daylights” puts Bond in the job he hates the most of his profession: that of the assassin. It’s unpleasant work, and Fleming lets you see just how much Bond dislikes killing–especially in cold blood. It’s a clever little story that sees Bond in a sniper’s duel between him and his opposite number in the KGB over the life of a defector try to cross the area that would become known as the infamous “Checkpoint Charlie”.

Pick up a copy on Amazon (affiliate link)

The Man With the Golden Gun (James Bond, #13)

The Man With the Golden Gun (James Bond, #13)
author: Ian Fleming
name: Matthew
average rating: 3.54
book published: 1965
rating: 3
read at: 2018/10/16
date added: 2018/10/16
shelves:
review:

You know, the more I think about it, the more I kinda enjoy this late outing in Fleming’s James Bond canon. It’s a pretty straightforward detective story, but we see get to enjoy the last appearance of Bond’s BFF Felix Leiter as well as an action-packed firefight at the climax of the story! It’s a desperate gambit that pits two desperate men against each other. This is the kind of action that should have been incorporated into You Only Live Twice–a REAL adversary that can match Bond in wits as well as skill! Unfortunately, his name is Francisco Scaramanga and not Ernst Stavro Blofeld.

Ideally, this would have ended the series, but there is one more collection of short stories that needed to be told. I would strongly recommend reading Octopussy, The Living Daylights, and Other Stories first and end Fleming’s franchise in a way that will make more narrative sense in the concluding chapters of The Man With The Golden Gun.

Pick up a copy on Amazon (affiliate link)

You Only Live Twice (James Bond, #12)

You Only Live Twice (James Bond, #12)
author: Ian Fleming
name: Matthew
average rating: 3.75
book published: 1964
rating: 3
read at: 2018/10/08
date added: 2018/10/08
shelves:
review:

You Only Live Twice might be my least favorite of Fleming’s James Bond stories. The characters are one-dimensional parodies (even by Fleming standards), Fleming spends far too much time describing the gardens surrounding the Castle of Death, and Blofeld and Bunt are hopelessly incompetent! Instead of an epic showdown to last the ages, we get a tottering old fool in the form of Ernst Stavro Blofeld, a shadow of his former imperious megalomania, and his half-witted wife Irma Bundt purchasing a castle in Japan in order to allow people to more easily commit suicide? Seriously, the man who first held the world at ransom with two stolen nuclear weapons in Thunderball then attempted to inflict mass starvation through engineered famine in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service goes on to raise the stakes by…populating his garden with every manner of poisonous flora and man-eating fauna so that depressed Japanese salarymen can still kill themselves in a spectacular manner (as, apparently, dictated by the Shinto religion?) while not doing so with the more “favored” methods such as throwing themselves under a pile driver or in front of a speeding train.

Even the “last, great, deciding battle” with Blofeld is lackluster: Bond gets lucky and the fight is over within a page or two. It’s bad. Like, it’s really bad. There’s no real sense of danger. There’s no real suspense. It’s just Fleming gushing about how wonderfully civilized the Japanese are since The War and how much he’s learned about poisonous plants over the course of his life.

Skip this one and read Thunderball or On Her Majesty’s Secret Service again.

If you’re looking for completion, go ahead and grab it on Amazon (affiliate link)

‘Calling All Earthlings’ Is A Sincere Look At A New Age Conspiracy In The California Desert

Guided by aliens, a man builds a desert time machine. Can the Integratron work? Will he finish it before the government finishes him?

Calling All Earthlings (2018) is a sincere documentary focusing on the life and influence of aeronautical engineer George W. Van Tassel as well as the people who have attempted to pick up where he left off in realizing the dream that is The Integratron–a domed building in the California desert designed, according to Van Tassel, by extraterrestrial influence during a chance encounter one night. It is a tale of coincidences and intrigue that begins at a sacred Morongo site and ends with a suspicious heart attack in a Pasadena motel room.

New age religionists claim that the Integratron building is a device designed to “reprogram” human DNA, giving the opportunity for prolonged life while the site’s caretakers claim that it’s a time machine that runs off the natural bioelectric field of the human body. Van Tassel’s own family claims that it is a source of free electricity based on Nikola Tesla’s Wardenclyffe prototype. The US government–particularly the FBI–in the 1950s frequently investigated Van Tassel’s activities in the Mojave desert and black helicopters from the nearby Twenty-Nine Palms USMC base add to the intrigue.

Did the government murder George Van Tassel for his work in free energy? Are there spirits roaming the Big Rock site, waiting for contact with the corporeal world? Will the Integratron work as intended? Like all good conspiracy theory stories, the answers are left open-ended, but the journey is a fun one for anyone who enjoys entertaining the idea of “alternative science” (even as a skeptic). The subject matter is treated with the respect that human beings deserve, and makes no judgement into their enlightenment or their quackery–much like Art Bell, et al. have done with Coast To Coast A.M. Interviews with locals, academics, and Integratron “stewards” dive into the feelings and emotions that one experiences in the area and pose questions about the madness that solitude in the desert can bring about.

Did George Van Tassel really have a close encounter with an extraterrestrial being? We may never know the real answer, but in Calling All Earthlings, the idea seems to be less answering the facts and more about exploring, documenting, and even celebrating the interesting characters who continue Van Tassel’s legacy.

Watch it on Amazon Prime

Adventitious Geekery and other distractions created or curated by Matthew "Atari" Eargle