Tag Archives: DRM

EFF is suing the US government to invalidate the DMCA’s DRM provisions

Cross your fingers; this could get messy.

EFF is suing the US government to invalidate the DMCA’s DRM provisions

Source: EFF is suing the US government to invalidate the DMCA’s DRM provisions / Boing Boing

Interoperability and the W3C: Defending the Future from the Present

This, ladies and gentlemen, is only part of why digital rights management (DRM) is so fundamentally dangerous to our basic liberties.

Imagine a new, disruptive company figured out a way to let hundreds of people watch a single purchased copy of a movie, even though the rightsholders who made that movie objected. The new company charged money for this service, and gave none of it back to the movie’s creators. That’s exactly the business model that a controversial project at the Web’s premier open standards organization seeks to prevent.

Source: Interoperability and the W3C: Defending the Future from the Present | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Anti-DRM demonstrators picket W3C meeting

RM DRM! RM DRM!

The World Wide Web Consortium, the decades old champion of the open Web, let down many of its biggest supporters when it decided to cater to Hollywood by standardizing DRM as part of the spec for HTML5.

Source: Anti-DRM demonstrators picket W3C meeting / Boing Boing

How Barnes & Noble stole the first e-book I ever bought

Another reminder, y’all, that the digital media you “purchase” is never actually purchased.

Sit right back and I’ll tell a tale—a tale of a fateful e-book.

Source: How Barnes & Noble stole the first e-book I ever bought – TeleRead News: E-books, publishing, tech and beyond

Librarian of Congress grants limited DRM-breaking rights for cars, games, phones, tablets, and remixers

It may not be all great news, but it is a start, a step in the right direction. Naturally, Congress could eliminate this waste of taxpayer money by simply repealing the DMCA (or, at least, Section 1201).

But there’s some good news: the rule permitting jailbreaking phones was extended to tablets, something the Copyright Office rejected three years ago. Then it said that it couldn’t tell laptops from tablets (raising two important questions: “why not allow jailbreaking on laptops”; and, “if you don’t know the difference between a laptop and a tablet, maybe you shouldn’t be regulating either of them?“) [emphasis added]. This year, thanks to EFF, it decided it could finally tell the difference.

Source: Librarian of Congress grants limited DRM-breaking rights for cars, games, phones, tablets, and remixers / Boing Boing

There’s No DRM in JPEG—Let’s Keep It That Way

If you have ever tried scanning or photocopying a banknote, you may have found that your software—such as Adobe Photoshop, or the embedded software in the photocopier—refused to let you do so. That’s because your software is secretly looking for security features such as EURion dots in the documents that you scan, and is hard-coded to refuse to let you make a copy if it finds them, even if your copy would have been for a lawful purpose.

Source: There’s No DRM in JPEG—Let’s Keep It That Way | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Revisiting the Sony Rootkit fiasco

It’s been 10 years since Sony infected more than half a million computer networks with its stupid DRM rootkit. Let this be a warning to you all: DRM is dangerous and should be abolished.

Source: Revisiting the Sony Rootkit fiasco