Tag Archives: Google

How To Replace A Nexus 5 Battery

Atari shows you how to replace a Nexus 5 battery. The technique is simple and can be applied to any phone from a Moto X to an iPhone 6!

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How to create app-specific passwords in Google

Sometimes you’re going to run across an application that uses the Google API, but for whatever reason does not support 2-factor authentication. Google has wisely built an infrastructure for such incidents. In your security settings, you can create “burner” passwords that can be used for specific applications. You typically don’t need to remember or write down these passwords because they are persistent on the device accessing Google, only accessible to one application, and can easily be exchanged for a new code if ever compromised. To get one of these passwords, head over to http://myaccount.google.com/security

If you’ve never used this section of Google before, it would be beneficial to take a couple of minutes to familiarize yourself with the options available before proceeding. When you’re ready, scroll down to “Signing in to Google” under the “Sign-in & security” section.

Screen Shot 2016-01-17 at 3.38.08 PM

In the screenshot above, you can see the “App passwords” heading on the bottom-right. Click this section and you will likely be prompted to enter your Google password again before accessing the app passwords section.

The following page will present you with a list of applications using specific passwords. To create a new password, just select the appropriate options from the drop-down menus and click “Generate”. You’ll be presented with a 16-character password that you can use to log in persistently with a particular application (such as Outlook or Apple Mail). If the password is ever compromised, you can simply click the “Revoke” button and the password is burned forever.

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Please Start Using Google Image Search to Kill Fake, Viral Pictures

Please. Do not propagate ignorance and hysteria.

If you scrolled through Facebook or Twitter this weekend, odds are you saw at least a dozen different pictures of Hurricane Patricia. There’s a pretty good chance at least half of them were fake or misrepresented. If you have an internet browser, you have access to a quick and easy viral image debunker. The internet will be a better place if we all start using it.

Source: Please Start Using Google Image Search to Kill Fake, Viral Pictures

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YouTube Red Deal Forces ESPN To Pull Its Videos From YouTube

I wasn’t too big a fan of this whole “YouTube Red” idea to begin with. Point one: I like a lot of YouTube shows, but I don’t like them so much that I’m willing to pay for a subscription to watch them. I’d rather endure a short ad in exchange for infrequent access to the same videos. Point two: If I make a video that I would like to monetize, I now can’t do that unless I put it behind a paywall (which will never happen).

Obviously, YouTube is making a play toward its biggest content creators, doubling down on popular “partners” like PewDePie at the expense of smaller creators who use the platform to build their followings and earn a few dollars on the side. They used to be “the Great Equaliser”–democratising video content on the web from the ground up–but lately YouTube is beginning to look like any other cable monster.

The fallout from YouTube Red, its forthcoming ad-free subscription service, is already underway. Today, the majority of ESPN’s video content has been pulled off of YouTube in the US, as the sports network currently can’t participate in the YouTube Red service due to rights issues surrounding its content.

Source: YouTube Red Deal Forces ESPN To Pull Its Videos From YouTube | TechCrunch

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Google book-scanning project legal, says U.S. appeals court

Fair use wins!

A U.S. appeals court ruled on Friday that Google’s massive effort to scan millions of books for an online library does not violate copyright law….

Source: Google book-scanning project legal, says U.S. appeals court | Reuters

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Google’s ‘Don’t be evil’ creed disappears as company morphs into Alphabet

To be fair, the “proper” Google maintains the creed, but who decides what “the right thing” to do is?

Killer robots, ubiquitous cataloguing of the world’s information, control over wired and wireless infrastructure…maybe Alphabet spun off just so they didn’t have to not “be evil” with their other ventures? Maybe I’m just paranoid.

Source: Google’s ‘Don’t be evil’ creed disappears as company morphs into Alphabet | The Verge

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What Ever Happened to Google Books?

There are plenty of ways to attribute blame for the failure of the Google Books project.

Source: What Ever Happened to Google Books? – The New Yorker

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Google’s Search Algorithm Could Steal the Presidency

The magical accuracy of search engine results may be the worst thing to happen to democracy since unfettered campaign donations.

Source: Google’s Search Algorithm Could Steal the Presidency

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New Court Evidence Reveals Hollywood’s Plan to Smear Google

SOPA isn’t quite dead yet, it seems.

Google and Hollywood are still fighting bitterly over the Stop Online Piracy Act, an anti-piracy bill.

Source: New Court Evidence Reveals Hollywood’s Plan to Smear Google

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Google+ and YouTube are finally splitting up

Ding, dong, the Witch is (almost) dead!

 

Source: Google+ and YouTube are finally splitting up

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