Tag Archives: Google

How To Replace A Nexus 5 Battery

Atari shows you how to replace a Nexus 5 battery. The technique is simple and can be applied to any phone from a Moto X to an iPhone 6!

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How to create app-specific passwords in Google

Sometimes you’re going to run across an application that uses the Google API, but for whatever reason does not support 2-factor authentication. Google has wisely built an infrastructure for such incidents. In your security settings, you can create “burner” passwords that can be used for specific applications. You typically don’t need to remember or write down these passwords because they are persistent on the device accessing Google, only accessible to one application, and can easily be exchanged for a new code if ever compromised. To get one of these passwords, head over to http://myaccount.google.com/security

If you’ve never used this section of Google before, it would be beneficial to take a couple of minutes to familiarize yourself with the options available before proceeding. When you’re ready, scroll down to “Signing in to Google” under the “Sign-in & security” section.

Screen Shot 2016-01-17 at 3.38.08 PM

In the screenshot above, you can see the “App passwords” heading on the bottom-right. Click this section and you will likely be prompted to enter your Google password again before accessing the app passwords section.

The following page will present you with a list of applications using specific passwords. To create a new password, just select the appropriate options from the drop-down menus and click “Generate”. You’ll be presented with a 16-character password that you can use to log in persistently with a particular application (such as Outlook or Apple Mail). If the password is ever compromised, you can simply click the “Revoke” button and the password is burned forever.

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YouTube Red Deal Forces ESPN To Pull Its Videos From YouTube

I wasn’t too big a fan of this whole “YouTube Red” idea to begin with. Point one: I like a lot of YouTube shows, but I don’t like them so much that I’m willing to pay for a subscription to watch them. I’d rather endure a short ad in exchange for infrequent access to the same videos. Point two: If I make a video that I would like to monetize, I now can’t do that unless I put it behind a paywall (which will never happen).

Obviously, YouTube is making a play toward its biggest content creators, doubling down on popular “partners” like PewDePie at the expense of smaller creators who use the platform to build their followings and earn a few dollars on the side. They used to be “the Great Equaliser”–democratising video content on the web from the ground up–but lately YouTube is beginning to look like any other cable monster.

The fallout from YouTube Red, its forthcoming ad-free subscription service, is already underway. Today, the majority of ESPN’s video content has been pulled off of YouTube in the US, as the sports network currently can’t participate in the YouTube Red service due to rights issues surrounding its content.

Source: YouTube Red Deal Forces ESPN To Pull Its Videos From YouTube | TechCrunch

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Streaming Music From The Cloud With Google Play

If iTunes is the centre of the iOS/OSX sphere of influence, then Google Play is undoubtedly the centre of the Android sphere. But at one time, it was simply a music service along the lines of the iTunes store, but it offered so much more than Apple did: it allowed users to upload a copy of their MP3 library to Google’s servers for streaming music to Android devices or through a browser.

Now, I have quite an extensive library full of rather obscure recordings and eclectic variety, so this came as a huge boon to someone like me. Pandora, Spotify, and Slacker could only go so far with their curated playlists full of repetitive tracks and limited playback options. For years, I’ve been looking for a solution to curate my music library for portable playback (“the Cloud” wasn’t quite a thing yet), and the only option available to me was the $300 iPod Classic (which has since been discontinued), a hefty price to pay for a dedicated device.

My biggest timesuck with Google Play’s music service has been cleaning my MP3 library. 30+ years of collected recordings tends to produce a few duplicate tracks now and again (many of which were songs pulled from Napster that I have since legitimately acquired by purchasing the full album). Granted, you are not required to take such meticulous care of your library, but I tend to be a little obsessive over cataloging, and I like everything to be just so. After several weeks dedicated to cleaning ID3 tags, eliminating duplicates, and filling in missing artwork, I was finally able to upload a clean version of my library: over 18,000 individual tracks! Google allows a whopping 50k tracks to be stored in your account, and the best part is that they will automagically replace your MP3 with the highest quality version available to them for streaming!

Now, I keep everything on a thumb drive organised locally via iTunes, then I upload a copy to Google Play for streaming to my devices: it sure beats the hell outta syncing and charging a separate iPod, I can guarantee that!

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How To Watch Netflix and Hulu in Linux

Linux is great for many applications, but the plugins that drive streaming services like Netflix and Hulu are closed-source and the developers have little to no interest in supporting a “fringe” operating system. Thankfully, the fine folks at Google saw the wisdom in giving back to the community that helped build them by building Netflix and Hulu support into the Google Chrome browser.

Install Google Chrome by downloading the appropriate package from the Chrome website and you’re ready to go!

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Google Maps refused to acknowledge my location

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I happened to be parked at 1 Infinite Loop, Cupertino, CA at the time. I’m not sure if Maps was refusing to acknowledge my location or if it was trying not to take me to the Googleplex.

I’m Sitting At 1 Infinite Loop, Cupertino, CA

Screenshot_2015-03-17-14-10-17Subtle, GOOG. Very subtle.

Google Can Now Tell You’re Not a Robot With Just One Click

When Alan Turing first conceived of the Turing Test in 1947, he suggested that a computer program’s resemblance to a human mind could be gauged by making it answer a series of questions written by an interrogator in another room. Jump forward about seven decades, and Google says it’s now developed a Turing Test that can spot a bot by requiring it to do something far simpler: Click on a checkbox.

Read the rest

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The Online Identity Crisis

The Googles and Facebooks (GoogleBooks?) of the world want to aggregate all of these personas into a single identity. They want to do this, not because they think this is good for users or because this is how they think society works, but rather because it helps them monetize user interactions. However, this type of aggregation is a very bad deal for users.

Read the rest at WIRED

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Kill la Kill and Megaman

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