Tag Archives: photography

What About Me: An Infographic (September 2012)

Starting to collect some interesting data from these infographics generated by Intel, here is number 4 in the series:

What About Me: An Infographic (August 2012)

Here is the third installment in what is, definitively, a series. I’ll do these as long as the website is available, then start extrapolating some information after I have at least a year’s worth (or as many as I can manage).

Quite Possibly One Of The Best Ride Photos Ever

Look at all those peace signs, and that girl in the corner is saying how much she loves us!

Judge OK’s Nudity At TSA Checkpoint

“I was mostly motivated by the absurdity of it all. The irony that they wanna see me naked. But I don’t get to take my clothes off?”

–John Brennan

Score one for the First Amendment

Brennan gets naked in Portlandia. [Youtube]
So this 50-year-old hipster, John Brennan was taking a business trip from Portland to San Jose when he was selected for the TSA’s favourite controversial toy: the “nudie scanner.” Well, instead of letting Big Brother take a naked photo of him to sell to some dubious website, he chose the manual option.  Long story short, the TSA agent found traces of nitrates on his gloves after the screening.  Nitrates, among other, more common sources of exposure, are found in explosives.  Mr. Brennan was in the process of being detained when he decided that he had nothing to hide, and exposed everything right there in the terminal.  Consequently, he was arrested and charged with indecent exposure.

In a rational decision by a local court judge, Brennan was found not guilty on the basis that his actions constituted peaceful protest and were protected under the Bill of Rights.  Score one for the good guys?

Catch the full story on Wired‘s Threat Level.

So, I’m Starting This Non-Profit….

What Are You Doing In Signal Hill?

Mighty Mouse keeps watch over the City of Angels
If you look closely, you might see a city through all that smog.

2012 Transit of Venus

Sequence of images of 171 angstrom ultraviolet transit composited together to show path of Venus. [NASA]

In case you missed it Tuesday, the 2012 transit of Venus across the sun was one of the very rare astronomical events we “regular folk” can watch and appreciate with little scientific instrumentation.  Like eclipses, transits are one of the few “sciency things” that garner public attention and appreciation any more.  Tuesday’s transit, lasting about 6 hours, was the last time Earthlings will get to see our “sister planet” until December 2117.  Fortunately, our technology has improved a little bit since the last pair of transits, and we have been afforded multiple opportunities to watch the actual event.  I was watching the live webcast from the NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii.

Events like this always strike me with a real sense of scale and I am imbued with renewed reverence for the Universe itself and for modern science’s efforts to understand it.  Venus is nearly the same size as our own planet, yet it looks so small against the burning disc of the sun.  There are sunspots that look like tiny flecks on Sol’s surface which are, in reality, large enough to swallow our world whole.  Even solar prominences–massive plumes of plasma arcing across the solar surface–that could swallow Jupiter (a planet with a diameter 11 times that of our Earth’s) with little effort.

I think the Warners said it best when they stated that it’s “a great big Universe, and we’re not.

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center released a stunning time-lapse video of the transit that’s available on YouTube and free download from their website.  The footage was shot from the Solar Dynamics Observatory and shows the transit in various wavelengths with varying levels of detail.  From Goddard Multimedia:

The videos and images displayed here are constructed from several wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light and a portion of the visible spectrum. The red colored sun is the 304 angstrom ultraviolet, the golden colored sun is 171 angstrom, the magenta sun is 1700 angstrom, and the orange sun is filtered visible light. 304 and 171 show the atmosphere of the sun, which does not appear in the visible part of the spectrum.