Tag Archives: Ubuntu

How To Install RetroArch And Libretro In Ubuntu Linux

RetroArch may be the single greatest contribution to classic gaming emulation since the dawn of Nesticle: a multi-console emulator frontend spanning the history of videogames from the Atari 2600 through Playstation eras. Libretro is the companion to RetroArch that contains all the emulator cores.

Installing RetroArch and Libretro in Windows or OSX is a fairly simple process of downloading the RA binary and the Libretro cores, but in Linux, it takes a little more effort.

First, add the Hunter Kaller repository to Ubuntu and update:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:hunter-kaller/ppa
sudo apt-get update

Install RetroArch and Libretro with a couple of terminal commands:

sudo apt-get install retroarch
sudo apt-get install libretro*

When you run RetroArch, the Libretro cores will be located in /usr/lib/libretro/

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How To Install The nMedia PRO-LCD USB Module In Ubuntu Linux

CREDIT: nMedia
CREDIT: nMedia

To maintain a level of authenticity, the VCR required an external display like the one originally installed to show status, function, channel number, etc. I opted to replace the original 7-segment display module with a USB-powered LCD to put a modern spin on the old look. There aren’t many display modules available, so I did a little research to make sure that the nMedia PRO-LCD would be compatible with Linux drivers. Fortunately, it is, but it took much cursing and gnashing of teeth to get it working.

First, make sure that the USB cord and power supply are plugged in.

CREDIT: nMedia
CREDIT: nMedia
cable3 USB
CREDIT: nMedia
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CREDIT: nMedia

Power-on the computer, and the display should show a test pattern with the words “MCE Indicator TM for Media Center” dancing around. Now, it’s time to install drivers!

From the terminal, execute the following:

sudo apt-get install LCDproc

Once LCDproc is installed, configure the daemon by editing /etc/LCDd.conf in Nano or another text editor. Change the following settings to the appropriate values:

Driver=lis

Foreground=no

AutoRotate=no

ServerScreen=no

Backlight=open

Heartbeat=open

Reboot, and your LCD is ready for input! Or is it output?

How To Setup IR Remote Control Access In Ubuntu Linux

What HTPC setup would be complete without a remote control to command your rig from across the room? For the VCR, I chose the SIIG Vista MCE Remote for its compatibility and range of functions. It also happened to be reasonably-priced at Micro Center when I bought it.

To get started, plug in your IR receiver USB dongle and install LIRC from the terminal:

sudo apt-get install lirc

During installation, you will be presented with a dialog asking you to select the specific remote control you have.

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For the SIIG Vista MCE remote, choose “Windows Media Center Transceivers/Remotes (all)”

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Then, choose your brand of IR blaster (if applicable). In this example, I do not have one installed, so I chose “None”.

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Allow the installation to finish, then install LIRC X Utilities from the terminal with the following command:

sudo apt-get install lirc-x

Test your remote’s communication with the irw terminal command.

Point the remote at the receiver and press a few buttons, you should get some coded output on the screen. If so, congratulations! Press C to quit IRW.

If there is no output, verify that the dongle is working (there’s usually a red light that accompanies keypresses) and that the correct remote was selected in setup. You may need to reboot for the computer to recognise the new hardware.

For more on remote control setup, click here.

How To Make Applications Run Automatically On Startup In Ubuntu Linux

Sometimes it’s just handy to have a particular application run automatically on boot, especially if your system is not going to have a keyboard or traditional input device attached. In Ubuntu, this is done quite simply by copying the application’s *.desktop file to a dedicated autostart folder.

The *.desktop files for your applications should be located in the /usr/share/applications folder in the file system.

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Copy the file for the application you wish to autostart, and paste in /home/.config/autostart (make sure that you are showing hidden files).

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If the folder does not already exist, you will have to create it.

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Paste the *.desktop file, reboot, and your application will start automatically.

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How To Setup Network File Sharing In Ubuntu Linux

Apart from using FTP to transfer files between computers, network  file sharing can be a convenient way to access files on remote computers. In Linux, file sharing to other Linux computers is enabled by default. If you want file sharing capabilities with computers not running Linux, however, you will need to use Samba: the open-source protocol that can integrate with Windows domains.

Samba is available in the Ubuntu repositories and can be installed easily from the terminal:

sudo apt-get install samba
sudo apt-get install system-config-samba
sudo apt-get install gvfs-bin
sudo apt-get install gvfs-backends

Reboot your system and you can configure your file sharing settings by executing the following command in terminal:

sudo system-config-samba

You will now be able to assign shared folders as well as users and permissions.

How To Install Previous Versions of Kodi (XBMC) in Ubuntu Linux

Personally, I’m not a fan of XBMC’s “Kodi” rebranding, and my plugins so far do not work in versions past Gotham. As such, I have needed to stay behind in the development cycle to utilise the tools I have come to know and love. (Much like OSX Mavericks over Yosemite.)

For Windows and OSX, you can easily download and install the proper binary directly from the XBMC archive.

To install previous versions of Kodi in Linux, you simply have to specify the version number when you execute the install command:

sudo apt-get install xbmc=2:[INSERT VERSION NUMBER HERE]* xbmc-bin=2:[INSERT VERSION NUMBER HERE]*

For Kodi versions (beyond 13.2), replace xbmc with kodi for both packages.

For a list of available versions, execute the following:

sudo apt-cache policy xbmc
or
sudo apt-cache policy kodi

For more information, consult the Kodi wiki.