Tag Archives: Verizon

Verizon Drops Contracts and Subsidies for New Customers

Well, it’s about dammed time Verizon decided to join the rest of the 21st century. Sorta.

The company is also simplifying its monthly plans by taking a cue from the fast food industry, offering plans in small, medium, large and extra large.

Source: Verizon Drops Contracts and Subsidies for New Customers

Verizon buys AOL for $4.4bn

The cable company is to pay $4.4bn for the once-mighty internet service provider, whose remaining value now lies in media, advertising, and its immortal horde of zombie dial-up customers.

Source: Verizon buys AOL for $4.4bn

When AT&T promises broadband—but delivers only 300kbps

For new homeowners, accurate information from Internet providers is hard to find.

Source: When AT&T promises broadband—but delivers only 300kbps

The Cabler

Waiting for the cable guy is certainly one of the most annoying things I have ever had the displeasure of undertaking.  Some dude with dirty boots comes into your house, snoops around, then has to run his grubby hands all over your keyboard to connect to the central switch.  The worst part is that some companies still charge you to have to experience this!  I know not everyone knows how to run cable through their house, or how to connect to the branch line, or even how to program the remote, but dammit I do!  I don’t want to pay for a service that I would enjoy doing myself!  That being said, enjoy some more break-in nonsense with “The Cabler.”

TV a la carte? I’ll Buy That For A Dollar!

According to anonymous sources via The Wall Street Journal, Apple is possibly in the process of wooing at least CBS and Disney into a subscription service for streaming television.  The basic rundown is that the customer could subscribe to a program stream without having to deal with those messy, customer-unfriendly cable companies that everyone I know loathes and despises in a vein similar to their affections for Terrorists and Nazi Zombies.

I, for one, am ecstatic about the prospect of only having to pay for the small handful of channels I watch (when I actually sit down and watch television).  If I want The Military History Channel, I don’t want to have to purchase Golf TV, BET, Lifetime, etc. when I will practically never find myself actively watching such tripe.  Of course, this is something we’ve all been subjected to since the advent and explosion of the format since the 1980’s.  I remember talk during the late 90’s about the FCC kicking around the idea of “TV a la carte” wherein, thanks to programmable receivers, consumers would be able to purchase subscriptions only for networks they actually watch.  Lobbies representing the cable providers (namely Comcast and Verizon, if memory serves correctly) immediately went into action championing the plight of the niche-market TV networks–small, usually locally-oriented, stations that have little to no widespread appeal (think low-power UHF stations of old)–saying they would inevitably be destroyed if no one had the opportunity to stumble upon them.  Thankfully, we now have Web 2.0.  With its proliferation of on-demand services such as RSS, YouTube, Twitter, etc., the “no one will ever see this” excuse is practically eliminated.

I think this is certainly the start of something new and necessary for the growth of entertainment, information, and technology.  With seemingly limitless options provided by the Interweb, television doesn’t have to be held hostage to timeslots…or location-specific receivers, for that matter.  My only concern is the fact that Apple might keep a stranglehold on the market–is there a way to make sure that the receiver software stays open?  I don’t want to have to deal with iTunes just to keep up with 24 or Doctor Who.  Frankly, I don’t want to have to deal with iTunes, period, but that’s a subject for another time.

In the meantime:  Streaming media to your set-top box, laptop, or phone?  Yes, please.