How To Optimize Your WordPress Website

I’ve been on a bit of a cleaning kick the past few days–probably because the new year is always a good excuse to declutter as much as possible. As such, I have taken to cleaning up and optimizing my website here. I’ll be fixing a few things as the year progresses, piecemeal as always. I’ll be cleaning up broken links as much as possible, removing posts that aren’t relevant anymore, and generally working to optimize WordPress as much as I can.

To start to optimize WordPress, I would start with deleting any database tables left behind from plugins that you have since uninstalled. There is a great plugin that will take care of most of the heavy lifting for you in this regard: Plugins Garbage Collector.

Once installed and activated, you’ll find the plugin under the “Tools” menu on the WordPress admin panel. Make sure the “Search none-WP tables” radio button is selected, then click “Scan Database”.

optimize wordpress with plugins garbage collector

The plugin will present a list of all the non-Wordpress database tables, but do exercise caution here. You absolutely should back up your database before proceeding. Check the box by each of the tables you don’t need and click the delete button.

Now that all the unnecessary database tables are cleared up, the next step to optimize WordPress is cleaning up all the ancillary junk that gets bogged down in your website–orphaned metadata, automatic drafts of posts, etc. The WP-Optimize plugin scans the most common sources of junk files in your website and deletes them, speeding up caching, prefetching, and other behind-the-scenes functions that make a WordPress site run smoothly.

Lastly, I need to clean up the unused images that I’ve uploaded. Not only do I have images scattered about that I have not used for any articles, but WordPress make four copies of each image for use in various areas! For this, I’m going to use DNUI (Delete Not Used Images) to scan my site and remove all the unused files. This isn’t so much an optimization, but a way to recover a significant amount of space on my server.

DNUI also lives in the Tools menu on the WordPress admin panel, so you should see it conveniently located next to the Garbage Collector. The first thing to do is click the “Options” tab, then click to create a backup folder and enable backups–just in case. (Un)Check any other options you wish, and click the “Images” tab to run the scan. The plugin will list any unused image files it finds in your library. All you have to do is click to delete them. A word of caution here: DNUI will list images from draft posts as “not used”, so please verify the images before deleting them.

For the interim, until I get all my drafts fleshed-out and posted, I’ll stick to manually deleting unused images. To do this, click the “Library” link under the “Media” menu on the WordPress admin panel. In the drop-down menu where it says “All media items”, click “Unattached” to show all the images that aren’t attached to a post. This is also not foolproof as it will list featured images and header images that are not already attached to a post, so err on the side of caution here. My suggestion would be to make a post with all your featured and header images, then set it to private.

That’s really all there is to easily optimize WordPress! Run these steps every few months and you’ll have a faster, more efficient website!

Also on:

Leave a Reply