Tag Archives: Cold War

Moonraker (James Bond, #3)

Moonraker (James Bond, #3)
author: Ian Fleming
name: Matthew
average rating: 3.69
book published: 1955
rating: 5
read at: 2018/07/13
date added: 2018/07/14
shelves:
review:
If your only experience with Moonraker is the Roger Moore film, please drop what you’re doing and read this book! In every respect–characterization, action, stakes, and plot development–this is the superior work. Fleming takes an oddly innocuous assignment for Bond–more of a personal favor to M, discovering a card cheat at the club–and unravels a treasonous Cold War plot that becomes the first of the familiar “Fate of The World” high-stakes gambits that James Bond is known for.

The scenery is local, but the plot reaches from Dover to Berlin to Moscow as Bond teams up with the Special Branch of Scotland Yard to investigate a murder-suicide at a defense contractor’s plant building the most advanced weapon to date: a transatmospheric guided rocket capable of hitting any capital in Europe with an atomic warhead–the ultimate defense against Soviet aggression or even a re-militarized Germany!

Fleming’s Bond in this story is far from the superhuman sophisticate we see in the Moore film of the same name. This version of Bond has a normal office job when he’s not on assignment and a human’s sense of mortality. The literary Bond gets injured (badly), he contemplates death (as he embarks on a suicide mission), and he might not even get the girl!

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The hidden base that could have ended the world

The Titan Missile Museum is located in “nearby” Tucson, AZ. I should take a weekend trip out to visit one of these days.

In the 1970s and 80s, crews sat at constant readiness in nuclear missile silos buried in the Arizona desert. What would have happened if they had got the order to launch?

Source: BBC – Future – The hidden base that could have ended the world

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TBS Sports: “USA/USSR Boxing Dual” (circa 1989)

I’m not sure if the (mis)spelling was intentional or not.

Fighting NOT for money, but for pride!

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The Secrets of an Abandoned AT&T Tower in Kansas

A mysterious AT&T relic reveals connections between telecommunications infrastructure and the Cold War.

Source: The Secrets of an Abandoned AT&T Tower in Kansas – The Atlantic

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Russia reveals giant nuclear torpedo in state TV ‘leak’

And you thought the Cold War was over….

The Kremlin says secret plans for a Russian long-range nuclear torpedo – called “Status-6” – should not have appeared on Russian TV news.

Source: Russia reveals giant nuclear torpedo in state TV ‘leak’ – BBC News

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The Cold War nuke that fried satellites

“Goldeneye, I’ve found his weakness….”

A secret 50-year-old memo to the British prime minister solved this Cold War mystery. But could a similar event happen again today? Richard Hollingham investigates.

Source: BBC – Future – The Cold War nuke that fried satellites

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The Alternate Universe of Soviet Arcade Games

In Soviet Russia, game plays you!

Source: The Alternate Universe of Soviet Arcade Games | Atlas Obscura

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The Moscow-Washington red phone wasn’t red and wasn’t a phone

Oh, Dimitri…Do you think you could turn the music down?

See what it really looked like — and why we remember it so differently.

Source: The Moscow-Washington red phone wasn’t red and wasn’t a phone – Vox

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This Frightening Animation Shows Every Single Nuclear Explosion That Occurred Between 1945 And 1998

Japanese artist Isao Hashimoto created the animation below to display the number of nuclear explosions that went off between 1945 and 1998: a staggering 2,053. Beginning with the Manhattan Project’s first nuclear device detonated near Los Alamos, New Mexico, the number of explosions starts slowly at first and then quickly speeds up right through to Pakistan’s own nuclear tests in 1998.

Source: This Frightening Animation Shows Every Single Nuclear Explosion That Occurred Between 1945 And 1998

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20 maps that never happened

Maps are a powerful way of illustrating not only the world that is, but worlds that never have been. What follow are not fictional maps — there’s no Westeros or Middle Earth — but plans and hypotheticals that never came to pass. You’ll see military plans for invasions that didn’t happen or conquests that were hoped-for and never achieved. You’ll also find daring infrastructure schemes that would have remapped cities and even whole continents. There are proposals for political reform — some serious and some more fanciful — as well as deeply serious plans for entire independent nation-states that have never been brought to life. Welcome to maps of worlds that don’t exist — but might.

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