Tag Archives: Los Angeles

LA Gear: “3 On 3” (circa 1992)

Let’s count all the 1990s things in this commercial!

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An Instance at Griffith Observatory

griffith-napkin

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Summer of 100 Photos, Day 59: A random item that you own

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Who wants to play “the ultimate status-seeking, power-tripping, money-spending game, babe” where the object is to “be seen in all the right places, wear all the right clothes, have all the right friends, or lose”?

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Safetyville

The Los Angeles Metro has published a new series of safety videos for the opening of the new Expo Line because, apparently, the Westside doesn’t know what a train is.

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City Observatory Calculates Cost of Urban Sprawl For Commuters in U.S. Metros

Researcher creates a model for calculating the cost of urban sprawl as a function of commute duration. Guess who’s is the worst. (I’ll give you a hint: it’s not Los Angeles/Orange County!)

More than $107 billion annually, or about $1,400 per commuter, a new analysis finds.

Source: City Observatory Calculates Cost of Urban Sprawl For Commuters in U.S. Metros – CityLab

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Giant space shuttle tank arrives in L.A. by sea

E.T. float home!

Sure, its arrival was not as elaborate or widely celebrated as the Shuttle Endeavour‘s, but it’s still a phenomenal piece of engineering and history come to roost here in the City of Angels. It’s a remarkable story of weathering storms at sea and even performing a rescue before being trucked to its new home at the California Science Center!

The space shuttle external tank known as ET-94 never flew, but it finished a decidedly different journey, by sea, early Wednesday when it docked in Marina del Rey atop a sea barge.

Source: Giant space shuttle tank arrives in L.A. by sea – LA Times

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Ride The Last Red Car Los Angeles April 1961

55 years ago, the legendary Pacific Electric red line shut down forever. This video captures one of the last trips on the last remaining Pacific Electric interurban railway. Ironically, less than 30 years later, this line would reopen as the first of the new Los Angeles Metro rail lines–the Blue Line–using much of the original track and right-of-way.

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At least there was a sign to tell me where to go

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A View From The Top: Santa Monica Airport

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The 5, the 101, the 405: Why Southern Californians Love Saying ‘the’ Before Freeway Numbers

The culture shock that hits me is how Southern Californians don’t use landmarks. Saying “the” feels natural here, but only here. “The 120” or “The 75” just don’t work.

How did Southern Californians come to treat their highway route numbers as if they were proper names?

Source: The 5, the 101, the 405: Why Southern Californians Love Saying ‘the’ Before Freeway Numbers

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