Tag Archives: Ubuntu

VCR Project Workflow: Linux

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How To Verify HDMI Audio Out In Ubuntu Linux (And Its Derivatives)

Assuming you have installed your graphics card drivers correctly, you will still want to quickly verify your HDMI audio out is working before any further mucking about in the operating system environment. In Ubuntu 14.04, this is done quite simply from the menu bar.

Click the sound icon in the upper-right corner, then in the context menu that appears, click on “Sound Settings”

Screen Shot 2015-04-03 at 11.02.11 PM

In the Sound Settings dialog box, verify that your sound card is activated and click the “Test Sound” button.

Screen Shot 2015-04-03 at 11.02.32 PM

Click the test button for each channel and verify the output.

Screen Shot 2015-04-03 at 11.02.38 PM

Other derivatives of Ubuntu (particularly the lightweight Lubuntu) do not have the robust GUI that Ubuntu features. In these cases, a little terminal jiggery-pokery will be necessary.

Verify the HDMI audio output with this terminal command:

aplay -D plughw:0,3 /usr/share/sounds/alsa/Front_Center.wav

Use Nano (or another inline text editor) to add the following line to /etc/asound.conf AND/OR ~/.asoundrc (depending on what your distro uses)

pcm.!default = pcm.hdmi

Reboot, and you should be up and running with full HDMI stereo sound!

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How To Install Intel Graphics Drivers in Ubuntu Linux

The motherboard that I picked up for the VCR project provides out-of-the-box full-resolution HDMI video under Linux, but requires an additional proprietary Intel graphics driver to process audio through the HDMI port. Thankfully, this is not a terribly difficult process thanks to the fine folks at Intel providing an easy graphical installer package.

Head over to https://01.org/linuxgraphics/ and download the .deb package for Ubuntu.

Use your preferred package manager to install the .deb package, then run the installed package.

Follow the on-screen instructions to install the drivers.

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With Snaps, Ubuntu 16.04 Makes App Updates Easier, Secure

Finally! Application packages that are self-dependent! Ubuntu could finally give the convenience of OSX a run for its money!

Ubuntu 16.04 LTS will come with support for Canonical’s (relatively new) Snap packaging format.

Source: With Snaps, Ubuntu 16.04 Makes App Updates Easier, Secure

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​Microsoft and Canonical partner to bring Ubuntu to Windows 10

Okay, Mr. Nadella, you have my attention….

You’ll soon be able to run Ubuntu on Windows 10.

Source: ​Microsoft and Canonical partner to bring Ubuntu to Windows 10 | ZDNet

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Troubleshooting XBMC Sound

Need help troubleshooting XBMC sound? Try these helpful hints!

  • If external applications launched via Advanced Launcher have no sound, try disabling skin sounds in XBMC. Sometimes there may be a conflict with the device being locked to XBMC (this is especially true in some derivatives of Ubuntu such as Lubuntu) and simply disabling the sounds should solve it. Adjusting the timeout settings in Advanced Launcher may also help, but it is more complicated.
  • Having problems with audio in XBMC? Check the device settings and verify the correct output device is selected. Settings>System>Audio Output
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How to set up LCD output for Kodi in Ubuntu Linux

So, after taking the time to install the hardware and driver for the nMedia PRO-LCD, we need a source of information to display on the external display. This particular set of instructions deals ONLY with how to set up LCD output for Kodi in Ubuntu. In Kodi for Linux, the XBMCLCDproc add-on provides the information to be displayed on the external LCD. Install this add-on from the Settings>Add-ons>Services menu.

In your browser, download LCD.xml from the add-on’s Github site into the ~/.kodi/userdata/ folder. Edit the values within this file with a text editor like Nano or GEdit.

More information on LCDproc syntax and configuration can be found on the LCD page of the Kodi Wiki as well as the Github site.

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